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Rejected from McSweeney's: Fantasy Architecture Film Festival

So you know how sports people are always talking about "fantasy football" or "fantasy baseball" or whatever?  It turns out that they aren't talking about a sports team filled with characters from fantasy novels or films.  (That would be so much more awesome, I know!)  What they mean instead is that they are "fantasizing" about the best team ever, in which they select the players for the different positions from any team.  (Or something like that, the specific workings escape me.)  Well, in the spirit of these fantasy sports enthusiasts, I would like to propose a fantasy architectural film festival, which would include all the films I'd like to show, if I had infinite time and an extremely patient audience.  Here we go!

Obviously
Mr. Blandings Builds His Dream Home
Blade Runner
The Truman Show
Metropolis
Labyrinth

The Heroic Architect
The Towering Inferno
Inception
The Fountainhead*
(ok, yes, it's a short category, we aren't very heroic.)

They're in the Walls
Die Hard
Brazil
The Matrix
The Italian Job
Ocean's Eleven
Mission: Impossible
Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets
Pretty much all the heist films

If You Build It, We Will Destroy It With Special Effects
Earthquake
The Towering Inferno (yes, again)
The Day After Tomorrow
Twister (ok, so it's mostly fields, cows, and cars that get destroyed, but some buildings do too!)
Escape From New York**
Ghostbusters***
Jumanji (omg when the floor turns into quicksand?? or when the whole house basically becomes a jungle?? so cool)
Pretty much all the disaster movies
Lots of superhero movies (and I'm looking at you, Transformers franchise)

It's the Future, Stupid
THX-1138
Logan's Run

Of course, there are dozens of other movies where architecture plays a starring role, rather than the part of an extra.  These are just the best ones that I can think of right now.  Also many of the films above could fall into more than one category, so feel free to watch them more than once.  I would.

This post brought to you by inspired by Geoff Manaugh at BLDGBLOG.

(*ironically)
(**not actually filmed in New York)
(***at least partially filmed in New York)

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