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When Life Gives You Coconuts

Here's another throwback post from something that happened last year, but was too good not to share since I have photos.

Imagine our surprise when we open the mailbox and discover...  a one-pound coconut!  (Despite its mailing labels, I suspect it was delivered by a pair of sparrows.)  Well, you know what they say: when life gives you coconuts, make delicious coconut macaroons macaringues... chocolate-covered coconut balls!

YOU WILL NEED:
1.  Hammer
2.  Coconut
3.  Some other ingredients... suit yourself
4.  Chocolate
5.  Patience and safety goggles
6.  Did I mention a hammer?

Step one:  Using hammer and nail, poke hole in coconut to drain coconut water.  Wait.  Set aside coconut water.


Step two:  Again using hammer, crack open the coconut.  This will be harder than it should be.  Then peel the coconut and shred it, while trying not to injure yourself.  This works best if you've baked the coconut a bit, to give it a false sense of security.

Step three:  Mix shredded coconut with other ingredients and smush into little round shapes.

Step four:  Bring out that hammer again and smash some chocolate into smithereens.  Then melt it.

Step five:  Dip coconut things into melted chocolate.  Bake.  Or not.  Eat.

Special thanks to you-know-who-you-are for the coconut.

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